SpinOffs

   

How to Design a Wind Turbine Rotor

by Kerry Oliphant on May 31, 2019 10:08:07 AM

In my previous blog post, “How the Design of a Wind Turbine Differs from other Types of Turbines”, I showed that the very small pressure drop across the rotor makes wind turbine design different from other types of turbines. This blog will focus on the best method to design a wind turbine rotor based on the fact that only kinetic energy is available to extract from the wind.

The Ultimate Fluid Model: Non-Equilibrium Modeling

by Mark R. Anderson on May 24, 2019 10:42:37 AM

In this blog series, I covered a lot of thermo-fluid options in engineering analysis, from the simplest perfect gas (When Perfect is Good Enough – Perfect Gas Models) and ideal liquid, (Fluid Modeling: Liquified ) to much more complex approaches (Going Through a Phase – Modeling Phase Change with Cubics) and (Getting Real – Advanced Real Gas Models). In this blog, I’ll cover the ultimate in thermo-fluid modeling: non-equilibrium modeling. It's rare and expensive, sort of like the Schorschbrau’s Schorschbock 57, a beer that sells for $275/bottle.

The Tesla Turbine – A Solution Looking for the Right Problem

by Barbara Shea on May 17, 2019 8:20:44 AM

The great engineer, Dr. Nikola Tesla, is best known for his work with alternating current (AC) electricity, but, did you know that he patented a bladeless type of turbomachinery in 1913? Called the Tesla Turbine, he developed it while trying to make an engine that was light enough to power his ultimate goal of building a “flying machine”. Tesla-type turbines can also be referred to as multiple-disk, friction, shear-force, or boundary layer turbomachinery.

Fluid Modeling: Liquified

by Mark R. Anderson on May 10, 2019 10:30:23 AM

Continuing on the topic from my previous blog, Getting Real – Advanced Real Gas Models, the counterpart to the perfect gas model for liquids is the “ideal liquid” model.  The ideal liquid model is very simple and is defined as:

 

            Density = constant

            Specific heat = constant

            Sonic velocity = constant

            Viscosity = constant…. or a simple temperature function

 

Getting Real – Advanced Real Gas Models

by Mark R. Anderson on May 3, 2019 10:28:59 AM

The Refprop program

The calculations in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Refprop program are generally considered the most accurate thermo-fluid models available.  The routines are widely used in many applications. 

 

The models

Several different models are embedded in the Refprop formulation. The most important are the  Benedict-Webb-Rubin equations of state for the pressure-temperature-density relationship. 

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